Posts

ACE 2017 Key Takeaways

ACE 2017: Key Highlights and Takeaways

There really is no place quite like it…

New Orleans was treated to an eclectic mix of HR professionals as customers from across the globe flocked to the Big Easy for ACE 2017.

The 8th annual Achievers Customer Experience conference was an unparalleled success, as clients and prospective customers exchanged ideas with independent HR thought leaders and decision makers representing some of the world’s most recognizable brands.

Day 1 of the conference kicked off with a series of lively and engaging speakers who introduced the various themes that were weaved throughout the rest of the talks. From the intersection of technology and personalization to navigating organizational change with an aligned workforce, the introductory speeches laid the foundation for a series of thought-provoking breakout sessions aimed at changing the way the world works! Major announcements were made during the event, including Achievers revealing the 2017 Top Category Winners for the Most Engaged Workplaces Awards and the release of Achievers Listen, a suite of tools that is taking employee engagement to the next level.

From the grand ballroom of the majestic Royal Sonesta Hotel, attendees were introduced to some of the developing trends in the employee engagement work space and various success stories from members of the Achievers family:

Achievers’ Chief Technology Officer, Aris Zakinthinos, introduced CHRISTUS St. Michael, who discussed how the implementation of their employee success platform in 2012 had a monumental impact on their business objectives, including a significant increase in recognitions given and leadership engagement as well as a remarkable decrease in their turnover rate, down to 6.4%, well below the industry standard of 19.4%. To read more about Christus Health’s success, click here.

Next up was Blackhawk Network CEO Talbott Roche, who discussed how to use the Achievers platform to drive innovation within your organization. Drawing on first-hand experience, Ms. Roche outlined the benefits of creating an engaged workforce and how recognizing and rewarding their creative potential yields great returns to your bottom line. Ms. Roche went on to highlight some of the success other members of the Achievers family were having with their respective programs.

One of the more recent success stories comes out of Michigan, home to Meijer Inc., a supercenter chain with stores across the United States.

From President and CEO Rick Keyes and Recognition and Engagement Manager, Randi Roehling, we heard about the monumental impact their focus on employee engagement has had since they launched late last year. Discussing how they laid the groundwork for a successful launch of their M-Team program, the duo illustrated the importance of executive buy-in, highlighting the amazing 12,000 recognitions sent out by Mr. Keyes in a few short months.

Next came Achievers’ very own Vice President of Product Development, Egan Cheung, who proudly announced the launch of the much-anticipated Achievers Listen tool. Achievers Listen is a suite of tools that empowers employees to give continuous feedback on what’s working well and what needs to be improved. It provides managers with recommended actions based on their team‘s unique values and culture. We know that every employee is different and to engage your entire workforce, we must avoid a “one size fits all” approach. Achievers new functionality allows you to do just that.

Closing out the morning discussions was an incredible speech from one of the most inspiring young women many in the crowd had the privilege to see. Hannah Alper capped off the introduction to ACE 2017 with a discussion on how minor actions can lead to big change, leaving the crowd both humbled and inspired, ready to springboard into a trio of speaking tracks which individually focused on thought leadership within the HR space (Aspire), best practices for running successful programs (Achieve) and the exciting product functionality and releases from Achievers (Accelerate).

The first day closed out with an amazing event hosted by Achievers. Nearly 300 conference attendees joined a traditional second line parade and enjoyed a lively march through Bourbon Street. The end destination was B.B. King’s Blues Club, where all were treated to some of the best cuisine and music New Orleans has to offer.

After an unforgettable night in the Big Easy, the crowd gathered on Day 2 for a rousing and humorous presentation on Fearless Leadership from Cary Lohrenz, a celebrated author and leader who became the first female fighter pilot in the US Navy. Her experience navigating the inherent challenges of breaking down barriers and shifting individual perspectives prompted unique insights into strategic leadership and diversity training, topics that significantly influence any business’s bottom line.

Closing out the conference was none other than David Novak, author and former CEO of YUM Brands (parent company to Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza Hut). Voted the “2012 CEO of the year”, Mr. Novak knows how to build powerful and diverse organizations. As the leader of over 1.5 million employees, he understands the awesome power of recognition. In his own words, he succinctly drove home what much of the conference covered: “Everyone brings value, worth, and individualism. You need to bring your team together. When you give people respect, appreciation and let them know that they count, they’re going to go to the moon for you.”

With that, ACE 2017 wrapped up. From keynote speakers to customer success stories, the conference illustrated the importance employee engagement and how to get the most of out of your workforce. With the sights, sounds and flavours of New Orleans still fresh on their minds, participants will be able to apply fresh ideas to their programs and drive success within their organizations.

Achievers would like to thank all speakers and every client, partner and friend for their participation in this year’s events. Stay tuned for more information on ACE 2018 in Toronto. Check out photos from ACE 2017 here.

Want to learn more about what was discussed at ACE 2017? Check out 4 Strategic Drivers of General Motors’ Adoption of Recognition Technology, which was written by ACE 2017 attendee and analyst Ben Eubanks.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

Also, while you’re at it, make sure to check out ACE 2017 attendee Coralie Sawruk’s blog post covering her ACE 2017 experience and why she is an advocate for employee recognition.

About the Author 
Darren SavageDarren Savage is currently a Customer Success Manager who works out of Achievers’ Toronto office. Prior to his arrival at Achievers, Darren was a journalist for various publications in the Greater Toronto Area. He left the profession to explore the world before transitioning into a sales role where he provided immersive educational experiences through travel for high school students. He now manages a diverse portfolio at Achievers where he helps his clients develop successful employee engagement programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACE 2017 Achievers Customer Experience

ACE 2017: Day One Highlights

Achievers annual mix of festivity and networking is in full swing with the 50 Most Engaged Workplace Awards Gala and day one of Achievers Customer Experience 2017 (ACE 2017) already in the books.

The 7th annual Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces took place on Monday, September 11th at the historic Saenger Theater in New Orleans. Amidst the finely dressed titans of the HR space, exquisite cuisine, and glamorous ambiance was the highlight of the show, celebrating the companies that go above and beyond in the employee engagement space as determined by a panel of employee engagement experts. After this incredible evening of industry elegance, Achievers announced the crème de la crème, the eight most engaged workplaces. This year, the Elite Eight consists of:

  • Alliance Data for Leadership
  • Electronic Arts for Communication
  • ARI for Culture
  • ATB Financial for Rewards & Recognition
  • ArcelorMittal Dofasco for Professional & Personal Growth
  • Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited for Accountability & Performance
  • Reynolds American, Inc. for Vision & Values
  • Total Quality Logistics for Corporate Social Responsibility

After an unforgettable night of celebration, ACE 2017 kicked-off on a positive vibe. Prominent members of the Achievers Leadership team shared the success story of CHRISTUS St. Michael Health System. After partnering with Achievers in 2012, CHRISTUS St. Michael saw:

  • a 4,500% increase in recognition given compared to the organization’s prior “home-grown” manual paper solution.
  • a 10% increase in associate engagement specific to leadership recognition from 66% to 77%.
  • a decreased turnover rate to an impressively low 6.4%, significantly below the industry standard annual turnover rate of 19.6%.

In addition to the A-players of Achievers, the opening session featured Blackhawk Network CEO Talbott Roche, who said of the event, ““This is all about celebrating the success you have with Achievers. One of my favorite topics is about innovation. Achievers’ platform is used to drive not just business results, but also innovation through engagement. It’s about how to use a platform to deeply engage. Engaged employees matter to company success. Companies with engaged workers have 6% higher financial results.”

After the keynote speeches ended, it was onto the fantastic slate of HR thought leaders discussing hot-button HR tech topics like employee engagement, rewards and recognition, and how to gain executive buy-in for engagement initiatives. Among the many memorable sessions was a presentation from Rocky Ozaki of NOW Innovations, who shared culture and operational best practices you should adopt to compete in the NoW. Beginning with a brief glimpse into the history of work, Rocky explained how the connected generation, technology and the sharing economy have solidified that the future is NoW.

With the war for talent raging, attracting top talent is harder than ever before. There is a remedy that can alleviate the need for competing for the most talented candidates on the market: retaining the top talent you do have. Cara Silletto, President and Chief Retention Officer of Crescendo Strategies offered insight into how companies can be better aligned with the wants and needs of a constantly evolving workforce, ensuring that the talent you’ve worked so hard to obtain stays with your company for the long haul.

ACE 2017 also featured numerous testimonials from Achievers customers illustrating how an investment in employee engagement can lead to tangible business results such as decreased employee turnover, increased productivity, and an improved bottom line. Becky Etsby, Senior Vice President of Human Resources and Organizational Development at Coborn’s, an employee-owned grocery store with more than 120 locations, stated as much during her presentation, “When employees are engaged, they really do care about the company and can affect a company’s profitability”.

After such an amazing day, it is hard to believe there is more to come. With speakers like Carey Lohrenz, the first female F-14 fighter pilot, day two of ACE 2017 is sure to be equally amazing. Check out all the amazing photos from Day 1 of ACE 2017 here.

Follow the conversation on social media with #AACE17 and follow us on Twitter @ Achievers.

50 ME Marquee

Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards Gala, always a marquee event

Brie Harvey

Brie Harvey, the face of ACE

50 ME Awards

50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards Gala

A-player smiles

A-players with A-plus smiles

ACE Social Event

Achievers’ Greg Brown and Chase Dolomont getting their grub on

ACE 2017 Stilt/Juggler

Post ACE march to B.B. King’s

ACE 2017 Tarot Card Reading

“I see in your future a trip to ACE 2018”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

top 10 work must-haves

The Now of Work

In my last post, I wrote about how the Future of Work is NoW (Now of Work) and it’s time to move away from this notion of some future state of work. If you’re taking your time preparing for this future, you are already left behind.

I hypothesized that the connected generation, technology and the sharing economy have inspired forward thinking companies to fundamentally change the way they attract, engage and retain their top talent.

Now of Work - NoW

What I didn’t share were the characteristics of the NoW of work based on my experiences and research and data from the employee experience survey STARFiiSH. While the below list is not exhaustive, they are the top 10 must-haves in my honest opinion:

#10 – Non-Hierarchical

This doesn’t mean you don’t have ‘levels’, but that everyone in the organization should be empowered to challenge the status quo and present innovative ideas. It means people over process (bureaucracy) and treating everyone equally regardless of title.

#9 – Trusting and Transparent

Trust is a complex term with no definitive definition in the context of organizational culture. If you haven’t yet, read the 5 Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni for the meaning that I subscribe to. I combine transparency because when you achieve that described level of trust you can vastly elevate the sharing of information throughout the organization. It’s commonly believed that outside of the balance sheet, organizations should share all aspects of the state of the company – from the P&L to the most damning customer feedback.

#8 – Remote and Flexible Working

If this isn’t offered to some degree in your business, you’re already on the endangered list.

#7 – Highly Collaborative

Cross-functional projects and teams elevate creativity and shared goals. Team members, with any amount of experience or tenure, have ideas to tap into, and they’re itching to share!

#6 – Constant Feedback

How often? I say weekly and I’ve seen and heard much success with tools such as 15Five to maintain a rhythm. I’m also a believer that nothing beats in person so schedule regular walks and coffee chats. For smaller team, how about lunch!  There is something very powerful with breaking bread together.

#5 – The Best Tools

It’s important to supply the right tools for success. If a team member prefers a MacBook, give that person a MacBook. If they are a Surface fan, then oblige. Tools include hardware, software, desk design, and even the whiteboard markers.

#4 – Personal Development

It’s no longer just about developing your team members to be better at their job, or preparing them for their next work challenge. Work life balance is dead; it’s just life. If you believe this, then invest in getting to know your team members as people first (with understanding of time off and personal development budgets) and help them achieve their short-term personal life goals.

#3 – Belonging

Diversity can often just be a vanity metric. Inclusion, when done right can be much more effective. What we are finding though, is that language matters and in the context of D&I, we are hearing that people want to feel like they belong – whether they are a visual minority, person with disabilities, a woman facing a glass ceiling, and yes, even from the majority group.

#2 – Innovation

In an exponentially changing world every company must develop organizational cultures where creativity and failure is encouraged. For what it’s worth, I believe that every company is a technological company and that you can expect to be innovated, disrupted or be made redundant by technology, likely faster than you probably believe.

#1 – Agility

Overused buzzword? No chance. When I think about the NoW of work, being agile in your operations and organizational mindset always rises near the top of my list. Traditional companies and industries, and unionized environments arguably have the most difficult time adopting this mindset.

Caution!

Every characteristic of the NoW of work can lead you quickly down a slippery slope if you commit too much, or too fast. Balancing this with the pressures of future proofing your business and subscribing to the NoW of work can be both complicated and frustrating.

On September 12-13, 2017, I’ll be in New Orleans speaking and then leading a workshop at the annual ACE Conference put on by Achievers. I’ll be sharing some of my experiences on how to work through this complex dilemma. Hope to see you there!

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author 

Rocky Ozaki

Rocky Ozaki, Co-founder, NoW Innovations
Rocky is the co-founder of NoW Innovations, an organization that inspires and brings people and companies together to collectively thrive in the NoW of Work. Join them in their quest to change our mindset to the NoW of work!

 

 

 

Performance Management Reboot

It’s a Small (but diverse) World: Performance Management for the Global Organization

I’m not going to lie to you: rebooting your performance management to effectively drive organizational performance, develop people, and reward equitably requires a good deal of serious thought. Managing performance at a global level, however, warrants serious thought on steroids. You must have a solid understanding of the legislative and regulatory issues, demographic trends, and labor laws from every jurisdiction in which you’ve got people. Hard enough. But the most critical global consideration for rebooting your performance management is to understand the cultural differences in your workforce. 

If we were to take a peek at what organizations have historically done to recognize these differences, we’d see that the tactics range dramatically from barely a nod (bad) to localized approaches custom-designed for each unique culture (excellent). Sadly, ‘barely a nod’ tends to prevail. And so many global organizations continue to struggle to optimize their talent management processes in the ever-expanding global market.

What is the right approach for implementing a performance management program for a global workforce? Well, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But if you agree with me that culture is the most important factor, then you’ll be sure to put a respectable amount of effort into understanding those cultural differences and how they will weigh into your solution design. And you’ll make sure your leadership is aligned with how you plan to manage various global employee groups differently from one another.

If you want to gain an appreciation for what will and won’t work here, I recommend turning to the extensive research conducted by Geert Hofsted on cultures in the workforce. In his research, Hofsted found five fundamental value dimensions that can be used to explain cultural diversity in the world. The “5 Dimensional Model”1 is one of the only models that’s based on rigorous cultural research, rather than opinion (which is why I like it). The five dimensions are:

  1. Power Distance (PDI): The degree to which people accept that power is distributed unevenly within a group or society.
  2. Individualism (IDV): The degree to which taking responsibility for oneself is more valued than belonging to a group that will look after its people in exchange for loyalty.
  3. Masculinity (MAS): The degree to which people value performance and the status that derives from it, rather than quality of life and caring for others.
  4. Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI): The degree to which people develop mechanisms to avoid uncertainty.
  5. Long-Term Orientation (LTO): The degree to which people value long-term goals and have a pragmatic approach, rather than being normative and short-term oriented.

What does this all mean for designing performance management systems? Let’s have a look at the traditional review process. The annual review is a widely accepted practice in countries like the US and the UK. In the US (and other countries with similar cultures) we score low on power distance (the degree to which people accept that power is distributed unevenly within a group or society) and high in individualism (the degree to which taking responsibility for yourself is valued more highly than belonging to a group that will look after its people in exchange for loyalty). With those defining cultural factors, we find it easy to accept the idea that very direct feedback is “the right way” to improve performance. This notion falls flat in high power distance countries, such as Japan. In fact, very direct feedback in these cultures is likely to be seen as dishonorable and disrespectful. This means that we have to take a different approach that fits these cultural norms and expectations.

Another interesting dimension to consider is how your planning horizon may vary from culture to culture. When I was at Hitachi Consulting, I learned to appreciate the very real impact of working within an organization heavily influenced by Japanese leadership. One of the most notable differences was the manner in which the Japanese leaders thought about the short and the long view. In the US we had a much shorter planning horizon in contrast to our Japanese peers. This difference in focus radically influenced how each group defined what ‘good’ looked like in both the short and long terms. At times this created conflict and stress when setting targets and measuring success.

When putting together your team to build your new global performance management solution, remember to include individuals who can help you understand cultural differences.

Rewarding equitably can be another tricky area as you navigate from culture to culture. The cash-is-king individual performance bonuses that we default to in countries like the US and UK are not a good fit in cultures that focus on greater responsibility, larger spans of control, and wider territories. Again, this showed up in my experience at Hitachi. The Japanese executives were quite surprised by our vice president’s bonus model, while the US leaders were struck by their Japanese counterparts’ lavish spending allowances. As they say, different strokes for different folks (or in this case, different cultures, different expectations). In some cultures cash rewards may even be perceived as petty. The headline? Tread carefully in this arena. If you’re planning a bonus program, be sure to consider which cultures value and expect bonuses, how you should measure them if you use them, and whether team or individual incentives would work best.

Beginning to feel a bit overwhelmed? Let me reinforce a few ideas that may help keep you grounded. First, when putting together your team to build your new performance management solution, remember to include individuals who can help you understand these cultural differences. They can be a voice for what will work and what is likely to fall flat. Get comfortable with allowing for differences across cultures. Your goal should be finding balance between meeting your desire for consistency and creating great experiences for your global team. Also, before you roll out your solution, test it in different geographies and cultures — not just the solution itself, but also the supporting content, since some degree of localization is likely to be needed on that as well.

In the end, keep humanity at the forefront of your design, and never forget that this is about your people, not the process!

If you want to learn more about performance management, join me at Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017 September 12-13 where I will be speaking on How Performance Management Is Killing Performance – And What to Do About It. Check out details of my speaking session and the event here.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author

Tamra ChandlerTamra Chandler is a bona fide people maven. She’s spent the majority of her career thinking about people, researching how they’re motivated, and developing new and effective ways for organizations to achieve the ultimate win-win: inspired people driving inspiring performance. She’s also the CEO and co-founder of PeopleFirm, one of Washington State’s fastest-growing businesses and most successful women-owned firms. An award-winning leader in her field (she’s been recognized by Consulting Magazine twice as one of the top consultants in the U.S.), she is the author of How Performance Management is Killing Performance — and What to Do About It.

 

Source:
1. Geert Hofstede, Culture’s Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations (London, UK: Sage Publications, 2003).

Get In the NoW

The Future of Work is Now

evolution of work

For seemingly a decade now, we’ve heard the term the Future of Work (FoW) and how the workplace is going to be dramatically different…in the future. In my opinion, it’s time to change the vernacular and mindset to the Now of Work – or fittingly, the “NoW”.

Why do I believe this?  Well, I’m no scientist, but I believe another evolution is taking place.  Here’s my thinking:

Beginning of Work BOWBack in the day, there lived a dude, let’s call him Bartholomeus. He existed during the Beginning of Work (BoW). He was literally bowing down a lot, and as part of a family and tribe, shared responsibility for survival. These were difficult times but life was presumably straightforward – hunt, gather, eat, make fire, make shelter, make babies. Work and life were synonymous.

Legacy of WorkFast forward a few hundred million years and you’ll meet Larry. His generation made a profound impact after the second industrial revolution, but this period of wealth creation also created inequalities and dare I say…greed. Most people began living to work. The accumulation of wealth and status came at the expense of health, faith, family and friends. I call this the relative LoW point in the history of work. It’s this Legacy of Work (LoW) that I believe is long past it’s best before date. Say buh-bye to nine-to-five, lifetime jobs, strict hierarchy, suits, male dominated boardrooms, profit before planet, and the dreaded annual review.

Future of WorkNext came Frankie. For the last seven years or so, there’s been a mainstream push for companies to prepare for the Future of Work (FoW). Thought leaders and futurists started to predict that an exponentially changing world meant rapid automation, AI/machine learning, and loss of jobs to robots. What jobs do remain will look very different from, say, 2010. They’ve told us we better act more like a startup tech company and let the millennial “wants” prevail. Fear, from either robots or the millennial hipster, had arrived. The FoW to many people has become an unknown, and even scary or irresponsible proposition.

Now of WorkLuckily, Niobe is here to save the day. She represents the NoW of work. Yes, I believe the NoW is dramatically different than most workplaces today, but excitement should overshadow fear. Organizations that empower and enable the NoW are ones where innovation and agility are rooted in the company DNA. Where technology and a multi-generational workforce seamlessly collaborate and where work and life become one again. It’s not some future state. Bartholomeus would be proud to know so many companies are living and thriving in the NoW today.

This is what the evolution looks like on one graphic.

evolution of work
So why NoW?  I believe there are three forces that have solidified the fundamental shifts in the workplace: the connected generation (not just millennials); technology; and a sharing economy.

If millennials will make up over 50% of the workforce by 2020, what about the Centennials (Gen Z) and the Gen Xers (like me) who want a workplace far closer to that of the millennials, as opposed to what most baby boomers are accustomed to? By 2020, we could be looking at over 70% of the workforce wanting an employee experience that models what the millennials have co-created this past decade. Furthermore, the balance of power has shifted because jobs in the digital economy currently favor the skills that young people naturally have. In an exponentially changing world, this is a monumental shift.

It may seem obvious, but technology is changing everything. You either work for a tech company, or you work in a sector, company or profession that will be innovated, disrupted or made redundant by technology – likely faster than most think. So whether it’s the adoption of tech in your operations, or your product or service being innovated, tech will influence your lives.

Finally, the sharing economy has created marketplaces we only dreamed of. Yes, Airbnb and Craigslist are amazing. Those are ways we share or redistribute products and services. What’s most fascinating to me though, is the sharing of skills and knowledge. From democratizing learning, and open-sourcing IP, to the rapidly growing gig/freelance economy, the sharing economy has disrupted the way we live and work at a pace and impact few could have predicted.

When you combine those ‘forces’ as I call them, then it’s hard to dispute that the NoW is here and every company, at some point soon, will have to ride the wave or risk losing and attracting top talent, in an increasingly competitive labor market.

In my next post, I’ll share the top 10 aspects of a NoW company and provide insights into the culture you need to build to remain competitive. Let me say that no matter how rad these are, it’s not about on-tap cold-brewed coffee, foosball tables or Waffle Wednesdays. But for one, it does include employee rewards and recognition.

On September 12-13, 2017,  I’ll be in New Orleans speaking and then leading a workshop at the annual Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) Conference put on by Achievers. Employee rewards and recognition programs are imperative for the NoW and Achievers provides the technology and leadership that you should consider. Hope to see you there!

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author

Rocky Ozaki

Rocky Ozaki, Co-founder, NoW Innovations
Rocky is the co-founder of NoW Innovations, an organization that inspires and brings people and companies together to collectively thrive in the NoW of Work. Join them in their quest to change our mindset to the NoW of work!

 

 

 

STEM Talent

Competing for Tricky STEM Talent and What Performance Management Has to do With It

It seems like nearly every company I’ve worked with is struggling to attract and retain strong technical resources, whether their organization competes in the technology space or not. We can chalk up the demand to the advancement of science and technology’s role in nearly every industry, service, and product out there—combined with a shortage of the necessary STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) talent to support those needs. And while there’s a lot of literature available on how to meet the needs and expectations of this audience, it seems worth adding a few words on this tricky employee group, specifically in regards to performance strategies.

Let’s start with the employee’s point of view. While acknowledging that no two people will ever want or care about the exact same things, some macro themes come up again and again that resonate with STEM-oriented personalities. First, this group cares a great deal about their skills, knowledge, and experiences. They want to be current in their field, work with the latest and greatest in technology or science, and rub elbows with the best and brightest. Second, they like to be recognized for that mastery. This recognition can come in many forms, such as awards and certifications, patents, published works, or speaking at conferences—or simply being recognized by their peers as a ‘rock star’ in their space. They also care deeply about having the freedom to invent, build, design, explore, and play in their field. After all, how can you ever be a master if you don’t have the time and space to practice your craft?

Now let’s look at what the organization needs from this group. Clearly, the aforementioned mastery skills are important to organizations. Yet many companies struggle to give STEM talent the tools, training, and experiences needed to stay on the cutting edge of their field of practice. The more the performance solution you build for them can focus on identifying and aligning your best technical talent to the ‘coolest’ work, the better.

Another common tension organizations face is wanting all that STEM brain power aimed at the right work, rather than being distracted by other things. While we definitely want to put more focus on directing that talent to the best work, we also need to balance that with this groups’ desire for time and space to do their own thing. I get it: when you’re short on critical technical talent, it’s hard not to fully dedicate the talent you do have to your priority agenda items. However, you need to be a little more flexible to keep this very agile group happy. Google and other forward-thinking companies have proven that letting your people use some percentage of their time on their own pet projects pays big dividends down the line.

So how should the desires and interests of both employee and employer influence your performance design? I recommend focusing on what both care about – in other words, the win/win. Here are some ideas on how to do that:

  1. Keep your approach simple. Why? This group tends to hate formality and bureaucracy, so do you really want to irritate them with the process? Also, this is a valuable resource, so optimizing their time is essential.
  2. Push as much authority and ownership as you can down the ranks. STEM folks don’t like hierarchy any more than they like bureaucracy. The flatter your structure, the better. Create more opportunities that allow them to work in networked teams with control over their own resources. This also means more employee-driven and peer-based approaches. Let them be the rock star in their crowd.
  3. Invest in building clear technical career paths, and in creating the content necessary for enabling and communicating those paths. Share information on how they can build their mastery within your organization, and provide them with resources outside the walls as well.
  4. Build a model where you can assess the technical skills, knowledge, and capabilities that are housed within your organization. A strong technical competency/capability model will do this. It will also help to have the technical career path agenda mentioned above.
  5. Ensure that your talent review processes prioritize mobility. In other words, keep your STEM talent moving across the org to increase collaboration, the sharing of knowledge, and to enhance their growth, experiences, and learnings.
  6. Celebrate their brilliance (often). Find ways to highlight progress, solutions, invention, things of beauty, and innovation. This may be at a team level as much as it is at the individual level. Recognition can be as simple as a toast at the Friday happy hour or as formal and highly visible as company-wide recognition like displaying patents or other awards prominently in the office halls, or granting annual innovation awards internally.

And remember, always connect your investments and their rewards to the things they care about: building their mastery, recognition of that mastery, and the time and freedom to play.

If you want to learn more about performance management, join me at Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017 September 12-13 where I will be speaking on How Performance Management Is Killing Performance – And What to Do About It. Check out details of my speaking session and the event here.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author
Tamra ChandlerTamra Chandler is a bona fide people maven. She’s spent the majority of her career thinking about people, researching how they’re motivated, and developing new and effective ways for organizations to achieve the ultimate win-win: inspired people driving inspiring performance. She’s also the CEO and co-founder of PeopleFirm, one of Washington State’s fastest-growing businesses and most successful women-owned firms. An award-winning leader in her field (she’s been recognized by Consulting Magazine twice as one of the top consultants in the U.S.), she is the author of How Performance Management is Killing Performance — and What to Do About It.

 

 

 

Employee Engagement

Why Your CEO Doesn’t Care About Employee Engagement (Yet)

It seems that we can’t turn around today without having a conversation that touches on employee engagement. Yet despite all the attention, it hasn’t really moved the needle. In the time that Gallup has been measuring engagement, it hasn’t changed–engagement levels are hovering right around 30 percent. At the same time, Google data shows that there’s been a steady climb in searches and interest in the topic for the last five years.

But to what end? Many companies are trying to improve this measure with little or no success.

I’m going to offer two answers to this question that not only illuminate the problem, but give you some options to consider as you try to combat the problematic issue of disengaged employees.

Engagement Should Not Be an HR Program

The first response many leaders have when they get that annual feedback survey from employees to say, “Oh, no! Engagement is down. Let’s create a program to push engagement up!”

Good luck with that.

The truth is that employees are probably tired of your “programs.” Programs begin and end. A great employment relationship does more to drive engagement than a one-size-fits-all program that’s going to last a few weeks and fade into memory. Plus, as long as the company is meeting the basic elements of an employee’s needs financially, other factors come into play for influencing the level of engagement, according to motivational theory.

A large chunk of money isn’t even going to work, even though many companies can’t afford to offer that to each of their staff. More money has been shown to reduce dissatisfaction, but it doesn’t drive happiness or increased satisfaction for the employee.

The challenge is to see engagement not as a one-off activity, but as a holistic view of the employee experience. Being able to tie each of those disparate activities together into a cohesive experience that employees are proud of is a key element to ultimately driving engagement numbers. That means everything from the first moment the person applies for a job all the way through to managing work schedules, getting performance reviews, and beyond.

Every opportunity for interaction with the organization is either a plus or a minus in the engagement column, and while we can’t expect to win every battle every time, the goal is to keep that number going in a positive direction over time (and reaping the rewards of that increased engagement, which we’ll talk about below).

Engagement Should Not Be the Ultimate Outcome

Some leaders check engagement scores as if they were the latest sports scores, hoping for good things but feeling no control over the outcome. In reality, engagement is not the outcome we are shooting for–we are looking for something deeper and more meaningful. It’s time to change the way we think about this HR metric, because it needs to become a leading business metric. Consider the following examples of how engagement can lead to increased value for virtually any company:

  • Innovation. Companies everywhere are trying to create more innovative atmospheres for employees. But what if the answer isn’t open office space but a higher engagement score? Innovation is a key outcome of engagement. Research by Gallup found that 61 percent of engaged employees feed off the creativity of their colleagues, compared to a mere 9 percent of disengaged employees. In addition, it found that 59 percent of engaged employees believe their job brings out their most creative ideas, compared to only 3 percent of disengaged employees.
  • Retention. The only thing better than engaging our employees is keeping them around to deliver excellent results over time. Towers Watson research points out that retention is tied in with many of the factors that play into employee engagement, such as career advancement opportunities, confidence in senior leadership, and a manageable amount of work-related stress. Manage those factors well, and employees will stick around and produce results.
  • Revenue. In a discussion of concrete impacts, we would be remiss if we didn’t touch on the one that matters most to many organizations: the bottom line. There are several pieces of research that demonstrate the link between engagement and financial results. According to Towers Perrin research, companies with engaged workers have 6 percent higher net profit margins, and Kenexa research points out that engaged companies have five times higher shareholder returns over five years.

Each of these points helps to paint a more nuanced picture of employee engagement, establishing it not as a standalone program or an end result, but as a holistic journey towards greater business results. And that, ultimately, is how we can get the CEO, the leadership team, and the rest of the company on board with the idea of promoting and supporting engagement as a long-term business strategy.

Want to learn more about this topic and dig deeper into the concept? I’ll be leading a session titled Stop Measuring Engagement For Its Own Sake at the Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017 event in New Orleans and I’d love to have you join me for the discussion.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author
Ben Eubanks
Ben Eubanks, Principal Analyst, Lighthouse Research
Ben Eubanks is a human capital management industry analyst who helps companies and vendors with strategy, content, and more. Ben has over seven years of tactical and strategic experience spanning all areas of HR and he is a nationally-recognized author and speaker on trends and best practices in human capital management. Ben is the principal analyst at Lighthouse Research & Advisory where he oversees the development of research, assets, and insights to support HR, learning, and talent vendors across the globe. Ben also co-founded the HRevolution conference for HR and recruiting leaders and is one of four members that holds this annual event, attracting hundreds of attendees from around the globe since its inception.

 

 

revamp performance management

Your Performance Management Is Not Fine: Defending Against the Naysayers

One busy Friday, I met with a West Coast client in the morning and then returned to my office to take a call from one of my East Coast clients in the afternoon. In the span of a few scant hours, both of my clients used the exact same phrase to describe their current performance management programs: “Our performance management program is fine.”

All weekend that phrase was stuck in my brain like an annoying popcorn hull wedged between my teeth. I pondered what those words meant to each of them and what ugly truths might lurk beneath an innocuous word like “fine.” I think that phrase spoke loudly to me because I’d heard it so many times before.

So, what do people mean when they tell me that their performance program is fine? Perhaps it’s this:

Performance Management FINE Chart

The low expectations expressed in the phrase “Our performance management is fine” are indicative of how much we’ve lost sight of our people. We seem perfectly happy to settle for “fine” on their behalf. But if our intentions for investing in performance management are to connect our teams to our strategies and goals, to recognize outstanding contributions, and to enhance the development of each individual’s capabilities, how can we possibly continue to tolerate “fine”?

If you’re reading this post, chances are you’re someone who is already at least partially on board with the idea of rebooting your performance management. But no matter how comfortable you are with the idea of throwing everything out to start over (or not – after all, I’m advocating a custom approach that’s tailored to the needs of your business, and yours might not need a thorough overhaul), one of the biggest stumbling blocks you’re likely to encounter is doubt, skepticism, and downright antagonism from the old schoolers in your organization.

When I have a debate with someone who is defending the traditional performance management approach or with someone who is fearful of making changes to such a deeply rooted process (and trust me, I have many such debates), I always hear the same counterarguments. So much so, in fact, that it’s worthwhile to prepare you to answer those same objections in your own organization. Do any of the phrases below sound familiar?

“My boss will never buy it.”

It is always wise to pay special attention to “the boss.” Engage, educate, and bring him or her with you. Of course, you can’t expect this to happen overnight, especially if the boss in question leans more toward the PM traditionalist mind-set. Meet leaders where they are, build a plan, pace your progress, and maintain your resolve. Find out what they really care about, then connect your case to that theme. Be diplomatic and creative, and make sure they understand the real costs (both soft and hard costs) to your business of continuing with the old way — in terms they understand.

“We can’t trust our managers.”

Other than getting leaders on board, this is the second most common concern I hear from people, and it’s a legitimate one. Since I’m advocating implementing a design that relies heavily on good, or preferably great, managers, this problem often stops teams in their tracks. It’s not a simple issue, either. It’s cluttered with questions of structure, role definition, and manager expectations. Many organizations suffer from being over-managed and under-led. This happens because we often promote managers for technical or functional expertise and not for their people or managerial skills, and because most organizations have historically underinvested in building great leaders.

If this resonates with you, I’d encourage you to use it as motivation to address the bigger problem (i.e., the fact that you don’t trust your managers). Start by peeling your own onion to get at the root of your manager concern. Do you have too many managers or too many levels? Are they not the right people? Are their goals out of alignment with what’s valued by your organization as a whole? I’m not saying that these issues can be fixed quickly or easily; in fact, this may create a completely new agenda item for you. But the fact that you don’t trust the capability of your managers has much more far-reaching consequences than its impact on your performance management. It’s something that you’re going to need to address, no matter what.

“Legal will have a fit!”

We know we need a paper trail to document behavior and performance problems, and we think our annual review cycle does that for us. Too often, though, it doesn’t. We’re human: we tend to rate people too leniently, and to downplay or completely gloss over potentially awkward issues. This is one reason why the reviews of underperformers and good performers often read very much the same. The problem then is that if a legal issue does arise, or we simply want to take action in response to an employee’s behavior or performance, we’re caught in a bind between what we really know about that employee’s history and a series of reviews that don’t appear all that bad. This can lead to a messy situation. It’s better to avoid this potential pitfall by documenting issues as they arise. Then the issues will be fresh and more accurately recorded—giving you better legal footing and a more actionable position overall.

“Why change? Everyone else does it this way!”

While the majority of organizations still use a traditional system, the tide is definitely turning. Today we’re seeing respected and forward-thinking organizations trying to drive organizational performance, develop people, and reward equitably in new and innovative ways. These pioneers have received significant positive exposure for their innovative programs. And that attention certainly doesn’t hurt their employer brand (a measure of how positively prospective employees view you compared with your competitors). You have a decision to make here: Are you ready to be out front, or would you prefer to wait until your competition has passed you by before you take action?

Maybe you have to wait because you feel you have bigger issues to tackle. Or maybe you’re simply going to procrastinate until you’re finally dragged kicking and screaming into the new world of performance management at some point in the future. But like it or not, the world is changing, and our old accepted practices will eventually crumble under the weight of the research and the evolving expectations of our employees.

Lead or follow—the choice is yours.

If you want to learn more about performance management, join me at Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017 September 12-13 where I will be speaking on How Performance Management Is Killing Performance – And What to Do About It. Check out details of my speaking session and the event here.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author
Tamra Chandler
M. Tamra Chandler is a bona fide people maven. She’s spent the majority of her career thinking about people, researching how they’re motivated, and developing new and effective ways for organizations to achieve the ultimate win-win: inspired people driving inspiring performance. She’s also the CEO and co-founder of PeopleFirm, one of Washington State’s fastest-growing businesses and most successful women-owned firms. An award-winning leader in her field (she’s been recognized by Consulting Magazine twice as one of the top consultants in the U.S.), she is the author of How Performance Management is Killing Performance — and What to Do About It.

 

 

 

Things to Keep In Mind During Onboarding

The Four People You Forgot About in Your Onboarding Program

Robust onboarding programs are now the new norm, or at least expected to be, in strong-cultured companies. Studies show that when you invest in a new hire’s experience in the first 90 days, their performance over the lifetime in that company is drastically higher than those without a strong orientation.

Yet most programs focus only on brand new hires, overlook four important groups of people:

  1. New Parents

A parental leave can last anywhere from a few weeks in the States, to one year in Canada, or as much as 14 months if you live in Sweden. When you work for a high growth company, a lot can change in that time span so coming back to work can be a real whirlwind.

These returning employees don’t want to be treated like a new hire — their time is more valuable than that because they bring with them a wealth of knowledge and experience from before their leave. However, they’ll likely need to be re-introduced to how their team is functioning, how company priorities have changed, and how processes have been adapted to reflect these changes.

Familiarizing them with what’s being done differently sets them up for a successful transition, so they can get back to work without missing a beat.

  1. People Returning From an Extended Stress/Medical Leave

Similar to parental leave, being off work for a medical reason may not always be a large chunk of time. But the length of time is relative — innovative companies change quickly, and what was standard policy a month ago may be ancient history now.

Medical or stress leaves can be due to a huge range of circumstances, and sometimes a full recovery requires a gradual or modified transition back to full-time work. Understanding how to meet the needs of your employees as they navigate this adjustment requires a completely different on-boarding process, and accommodating their needs will be crucial to setting them up for long-term success.

  1. Boomerang Employees

Whether it was an extended leave to travel, to work at another company, or to further their education, these employees were gone for a while…and now they’re back! They know the ins and outs of how your company has worked in the past, and need to get the update of what’s new and different since they were an employee last.

This group may benefit the most from being treated like a new hire and going through the onboarding process again, depending on how long they’ve been away. Each situation will be different, and will need to be handled accordingly.

If they go through onboarding again, know that they will be familiar with a lot of the information. So make good use of this, and use their expertise to assist in the orientation process for others!

  1. Contract Extensions and Promotions to Full-Time Staff

We’ve all seen it done before — it’s easier to hire contract employees and put them right to work. It’s a sneaky way to avoid the initial start-up costs associated with a new hire (including training time and technology requirements). But after a while, it’s not uncommon for contract extensions to turn into a full-time-esque role…without ever giving that hire the proper training. After all — they’ve been around for so long, they already know how things work.

Knowing that it may be tedious to put them through a full new-hire orientation experience, these people managers need an expedited onboarding process for bringing on contract employees. Spending time on this process ensures that your team is all working under the same guidelines and it creates a more seamless work experience (and cultural structure) for everyone.

Human resources and new-hire orientation trainers are rarely charged with creating an experience for these groups. And, in some cases, rightfully so. These orientations or re-orientations can come with so many variables and exceptions, that they are best managed by the person’s direct supervisor.

When the manager is involved in creating the onboarding experience, they know what actually needs to be included, rather than going through the standard onboarding experience for a new hire. Nobody likes to feel like their time is being wasted.

If HR departments don’t trust their people managers to lead this process — then it’s better to spend time investing in developing stronger managers rather than creating another standalone program run by HR. Case-by-case exceptions require case-by-case action. Let your people managers handle that.

Teach your managers how to execute a stellar onboarding process, and they’ll develop great leaders from the start — whether that’s the start of day one, or the start of day 501.

Training people managers to be responsible for the entire talent lifecycle — from sourcing talent to final exit — is one of the outcomes of the Manager Start Line, my online management training program I’ve designed to take your people managers (and business) to the next level. Contact The Corker Co today for more information and learn more lessons like this at my talk at Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017.

Join me at ACE 2017 September 12-13 where I will be speaking on Am I Good at Managing … Myself? Check out details of my speaking session and the major HR event here.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author
Matt CorkerMatt Corker is the co-founder of The Corker Co and creator of The Manager Start Line, an online training program designed to take leaders’ people management skills to the next level. Matt has trained individual managers and their teams in organizations including lululemon athletica, Kit and Ace, Spiritual Gangster, The Westin Resort & Spa, Nurse Next Door, and the University of British Columbia.
Matt brings with him over 10 years of industry leadership and management experience, and often uses his extensive knowledge of best practices and forward-thinking people development theory to create custom leadership and culture development programs and facilitate high-impact conversations and projects.

Matt holds a BCOM in Human Resources and a MBA from the Copenhagen Business School, and is an Experienced-200 hr Registered Yoga Teacher – leading yoga workshops and trainings around the world.

He is an athletic opportunist, an avid traveler, and loves sharing that extra scoop of ice cream with the love of his life. Follow along at @matt_corker or visit http://www.mattcorker.com/

 

Increase Employee Retention

Who Owns Retention? The Real Employee Turnover Problem

What’s the biggest problem when it comes to employee turnover? No one owns retention!

At many companies, when turnover rises executives point to HR to fix it – whose plate is already overflowing with terminations, payroll, benefits management, and back-fill recruiting. HR then blames bad managers for running off good people, and the managers push back complaining that executives do not give them enough time or training to manage their people properly. They all have a point, but this blame game is costing those organizations tons of money!

Stop Focusing on the Symptoms…Find & Fix the Cause!

After much finger-pointing, companies often come to the conclusion, “We have so much turnover, we need to hire another recruiter.” Are they kidding? That’s like trying to fix a water main break with duct tape. You may temporarily slow down the deluge, but not for long! If turnover is the problem, then you don’t need to hire someone who’s good at recruiting – they’ll just struggle to fill all the positions that keep unexpectedly being vacated. You need a dedicated retention specialist who will diagnose the core issues, work to resolve them, and maintain a stable workforce moving forward.

So why is the default next step to add another recruiter? Because everyone knows what a recruiter does and which line item that goes under on the P&L.

Now before you get upset, I assure you I’m not anti-recruiter! Recruiters are great, when you need a recruiter! If turnover is a problem, it is very possible that reworking your recruiting processes might be needed as well. Perhaps you really are hiring the wrong people and/or it is time to revamp the interview process, selection criteria, and applicant communication plan. You may even need to improve your employer brand in your community if you don’t have a positive reputation as an employer in your area. These are all things a good recruiter could handle, but these changes are rarely enough if retention is rising.

So if you can get approval for a new position, how about pitching the idea of a retention specialist instead? It’s a tougher sell to get approval from the higher-ups – they’ll wonder what a retention specialist is, complain the role sounds fluffy and become convinced it’s going to add overhead costs that seem unnecessary – but you must fight for it! It’s time to get more resources to fix the real issue.

What Is a Retention Specialist Exactly?

More organizations are creating this type of position and the responsibilities certainly vary from company to company, but their primary roles are to determine why people are leaving, and to build relationships and initiatives that extend employee tenure. This often includes, but is not limited to:

  • conducting and analyzing employee surveys and stay interviews
  • building employee networks/committees
  • serving as an employee ambassador who can answer staff questions or listen to feedback
  • ensuring the onboarding process is welcoming, thorough and incorporates the company culture
  • determining gaps where additional supervisor/management training is needed
  • coordinating (and possibly conducting) supervisor/management training and development programs
  • identifying operational/system changes that help adjust to a shorter-term workforce
  • analyzing compensation, advancement opportunities and scheduling for models that better align with today’s workforce’s needs
  • implementing recognition and appreciation programs across organization
  • ascertaining ways the organization and managers can be more transparent with employees
  • developing effective staff meeting schedules, agendas, and tools for those leading meetings
  • crafting organizational messages that instill the company’s mission and core values

Sounds like a full-time job to me! Who on your current staff has time to do all these things that are needed to reduce unnecessary employee turnover?

One Person Won’t Resolve the Issue – Retention is Everyone’s Job

While having a dedicated staffer to focus on diagnosing and resolving turnover issues is essential, leaders at all levels must take turnover seriously. Just like customer service, retention should be part of everyone’s job and everyone’s training. Keep in mind, workers today will leave their jobs if they don’t like their immediate supervisor, the leadership team or their coworkers, so encouraging your entire staff to attract and retain talent is critical.

Is your organization incentivizing peer referrals? Is your company rewarding managers for improved retention within their departments? Or are they setting bonus plans according to the concept of “do more with less,” which is driving away the talent you can’t afford to lose.

Become a Champion for Retention

So where do HR professionals start? Here a few ways to attack the turnover crisis:

  1. Create recognition and/or incentive programs for employees who reach certain milestones (after one year, not five!).
  2. Demand more management training for everyone who has direct reports.
  3. Make a case for hiring (or becoming) a retention specialist.

Same Approach = Same Results

If the trajectory of your employee turnover is headed in a positive direction, keep doing what you’re doing. But if your retention is getting worse every year, it is time to try a new approach for attracting and retaining today’s new workforce!

If you want to learn more about how to effectively retain employees, join me at Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017 September 12-13 where I will be speaking on Leading the New Workforce: The Evolution of Employee Expectations. Check out details of my speaking session and the event here.

Learn More Red CTA Button 

 

About the Author
Cara Silletto
Workforce thought leader Cara Silletto, MBA, is the President & Chief Retention Officer at Crescendo Strategies, a firm committed to reducing unnecessary employee turnover by bridging generational gaps and making leaders more effective in their roles. Cara is a highly-sought-after national speaker and trainer, having conducted more than 100 engagements in 2016 alone. She has spoken to more than 10,000 leaders across the country at companies including UPS, Toyota, Humana’s Learning Consortium, and Cintas. Workforce Magazine named her a “Game Changer,” Recruiter.com included her in their 2016 “Top 10 Company Culture Experts to Watch” list, and she is a co-author of the book, What’s Next in HR. Follow Cara on Twitter @CrescendoHR.

 

ACE 2017

Event Activities at ACE 2017 in New Orleans, September 12-13, 2017

The effect of employee engagement on key business objectives is staggering. According to Gallup, highly engaged business units see:

  • a 17 percent increase in productivity
  • 24 percent less employee turnover
  • a 41 percent reduction in absenteeism

With such dramatic increases in crucial aspects of business sustainability, the importance of employee engagement cannot be ignored. While there are numerous techniques used to address specific business objectives, cultivating a culture of engagement can result in improvements across a large swath of these seemingly disconnected categories.

If your organization is suffering in business-critical areas such as those described above, please join us at our biggest event of the year, Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) 2017.

Our incredible two-day conference is calling The Big Easy home this year, so make plans to be at the Royal Sonesta Hotel in New Orleans on September 12-13. You’ll have the opportunity to network with hundreds of HR thought leaders, executives, and experts, offering their thoughts as to how to implement and maintain a world-class engagement program.

The fun isn’t limited to just ACE. The Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards Gala kicks-off the festivities the evening prior. Not only does The Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces Awards recognize the employers in North America that best display innovation in engaging their workplaces, it features a variety of opportunities for inspiration and education. Past winners include top brands, such as KPMG, Netsuite, Smart & Final, and Ericsson. Join us to rub elbows with the top performers and thought leaders in the HR and employee engagement space.

Jump In On ACE’s 3 Tracks

With three presentation tracks designed to inspire, innovate, and engage, you’ll gain insight as to how some of the most successful companies have leveraged employee engagement to meet key business objectives.

  1. Aspire (Thought Leadership Track) – Some of the most innovative minds in HR offer their thoughts on topics such as engaging the modern workforce and using value alignment to drive engagement.
  2. Achieve (Customer Success Track) – Learn how the most successful Achievers customers launched and leveraged their engagement and recognition platform to increase engagement across borders and obtain measurable business results.
  3. Accelerate (Product Track) – Achievers product experts demonstrate the capabilities of the Achievers platform, and how to use them to maximize ROI and ensure the most important engagement challenges of our customers are being met.

Be Inspired by This Year’s Keynote Speakers

Leave ACE 2017 feeling inspired and motivated by our amazing lineup of keynote speakers. 

David Novak

 

 

 

 

 

David Novak
Former Chairman & CEO, YUM Brands
Author of “The Unlikely CEO” and “Taking People with you”

As CEO of YUM (the parent company of Taco Bell, Pizza Hut and KFC), David was responsible for overseeing more than 41,000 restaurants in over 120 countries, employing over 1.5 million employees worldwide.

Novak’s leadership and drive to empower diverse workforces is the very bedrock of Yum!’s astounding growth story. Novak’s deep commitment to building great leaders and a vibrant organization is best evidenced by the fact that he has personally trained thousands of Yum! managers while he was CEO. In his book and in his keynote presentation, Novak delivers a battle-tested leadership guide on how to build great companies through developing great talent. 

Carey Lohrenz

 

 

 

 

 

Carey Lohrenz
First Female F-14 Tomcat Fighter Pilot in the U.S. Navy

Having flown missions worldwide as a combat-mission-ready United States Navy pilot, Carey Lohrenz is used to working in fast moving, dynamic environments, where inconsistent execution can generate catastrophic results. The same challenges are found in business: markets change, customer needs evolve and if you do not adapt quickly your company is at risk.

Carey is a powerhouse in the field of delivering engaging leadership, high performing organizations and diversity training that directly impacts a company’s ROI and bottom line. Her experience in the all-male environment of fighter aviation and her ability to pass on the lessons Learned in her career allow her to deliver insight and guidance from a credible platform on women’s leadership Issues.

In addition to our amazing lineup of keynote speakers, we will also be offering breakout sessions from thought leaders such as:

Cara Silletto

 

 

 

 

Cara Silletto
President & Chief Retention Officer at Crescendo Strategies

Workforce thought leader Cara Silletto, MBA, is the President & Chief Retention Officer at Crescendo Strategies, a company committed to reducing unnecessary employee turnover for clients across the country by bridging generational gaps and making leaders more effective in their roles.

Tamra Chandler

 

 

 

 

Tamra Chandler
CEO and Co-Founder of PeopleFirm

Tamra Chandler is a bona fide people maven. She’s spent the majority of her career thinking about people, researching how they’re motivated, and developing new and effective ways for organizations to achieve the ultimate win-win: inspired people driving inspiring performance. She’s also the CEO and co-founder of PeopleFirm, one of Washington State’s fastest-growing businesses and most successful women-owned firms.

Ben Eubanks

 

 

 

 

Ben Eubanks
Principal Analyst, Lighthouse Research

Ben Eubanks is a human capital management industry analyst who helps companies and vendors with strategy, content, and more. Ben has over seven years of tactical and strategic experience spanning all areas of HR and he is a nationally-recognized author and speaker on trends and best practices in human capital management. Ben is the principal analyst at Lighthouse Research & Advisory where he oversees the development of research, assets, and insights to support HR, learning, and talent vendors across the globe.

And this is just a taste of some of the speakers this year. Check out the entire list of ACE 2017 speakers here.

Stay tuned for more updates and details on ACE 2017, as well as a series of guest blogs from featured speakers at this year’s event. Also, don’t forget to join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #AACE17 and by following @Achievers on Twitter.

Register now to claim your spot at ACE 2017. The first Po’ boy is on me. See you in New Orleans!

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

About the Author

Iain FerreiraIain Ferreira is the Content Marketing Manager at Achievers. He lives in San Francisco. You can view his Linkedin profile here.