Posts

improve employee surveys

5 Things to Consider When Building Employee Surveys

Did you know that 88% of employees don’t have passion for their work? Even worse is the impact employee disengagement has on economy: employee disengagement costs more than $500 billion per year to the U.S. economy alone. Knowing all of this, I ask you, “What can your business do to address this major disengagement issue?”

Start with listening to your employees. By receiving honest feedback from employees, you can quickly determine what it takes to engage them. You’ll be aware of what your workforce is unhappy about as well as what they value most when it comes to working for your company.

The best way to receive honest feedback from employees is through employee surveys. Company-wide employee surveys are a valuable use of HR technology, and their results can yield important benefits for employee happiness and company transparency. Furthermore, with increasing emphasis on pulse surveys, companies have greater access to real-time metrics pertaining to employee engagement. Here are a handful of helpful tips for what you should look for when you’re putting together a survey for your employees.

1. Open-Ended Questions

When you’re measuring employee engagement, it’s best to leave room for employees to elaborate on specifics pertaining to their survey response. Human resources professionals need to hear about the details that make up worker safety and wellness, so it’s helpful to include some open-ended inquiries such as, “What can the company do to increase employee success?” With open-ended questions, employees get the opportunity to voice their opinion without any restrictions or influences.

2. Anonymity

You’re aiming for 100 percent participation in your employee engagement survey, and as leadership author Bob Herbold points out, anonymity is the best way to assure this. Quality HR technology software increases employee accountability by making sure that everyone has participated, while at the same time keeping individual responses private. It can also be useful in some cases to tailor the content of each survey to individual departments.

3. Individual Analytics for Each Topic

Many companies are looking to quickly institute their survey initiative, resulting in a survey that is narrow in its scope. According to USC research scientist Alec Levenson , this mistake can have major consequences when tallying the results of employee surveys. Typically, it exists when a company aims for simplicity by averaging each person’s responses into one single index number. Levenson explains that this number ends up being meaningless because it doesn’t lead to actionable insights. For this reason, it’s essential that each surveyed topic be analyzed separately.

4. An Action Plan

Of course, when you give out an employee survey, you’d like to see nothing but glowing praise and complete employee alignment with your organization’s mission and values. In the real world, however, you’re going to hear from some team members who are less than thrilled with the status quo. Research on surveying shows that 48 percent of disengaged employees say that they “would stay with a company that asks them what they want and puts that feedback into action.” Don’t forget that the main reason behind pushing out an employee survey is to discovers areas your business can improve on to boost employee engagement and happiness. Make sure to include questions about employee engagement that you are truly willing to address which will help course correct your company culture onto the right path.

5. Professional Expertise

Partnering with a professional survey provider yields numerous benefits and will yield a strong ROI in your employee retention and employee transparency numbers. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, Monster.com points out that experts in the survey field can give you valuable benchmarking data for your industry. It’s helpful to know where you stand with respect to your competition.

The next time you decide to send a company-wide employee survey out, consider our list of five things to consider when crafting effective employee surveys. Instituting regular employee surveys is the best way to create a responsive work culture. With regular feedback being provided by your employees, you’ll have the opportunity to quickly address any negative aspects of your company culture. This in turn will help in recruiting and hiring top talent, thus ensuring your company’s long-term financial health.

Are you ready to listen to your employees? Get started with Achievers Listen, the future of employee engagement. Achievers Listen allows employees to provide feedback to management on day-to-day issues via check-ins and pulse surveys, and lets front-line supervisors track trends through manager alerts. Also included with Achievers Listen is Allie, an intelligent, digital “coach” that interacts with employees in a familiar conversational way, while guiding employees with effective feedback and providing recommendations back to managers.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

Do you have any thoughts on this article? Share your comments below.

 

Important Pillars of HR

5 Pillars of a Successful HR Strategy

How successful is your current HR strategy? The role of the HR department has evolved over the years, transitioning from the traditional “hire and fire” arm of the business to a strategic position. Today, HR departments are not only responsible for recruiting new talent and onboarding employees, but also establishing a positive workplace culture and environment.

Juggling the traditional tasks with those that come with being an HR professional in the modern workplace can be challenging. When trying to meet the needs of the business and its employees, important details can often be overlooked.

Below are five HR pillars every organization should be aware of when developing or refining their HR strategy.

  1. Legal Requirements 

When onboarding an employee, it’s important that you follow and fulfill all legal requirements to ensure that you protect the business and the employee. For instance, every full-time employee should fill out an IRS W-4 form and I-9 form. Another important legal requirement is workers compensation.

Regardless of the working conditions, workers compensation is required of all businesses:

“If you have any employees—even just one—you are responsible for including workers’ compensation insurance (in most states) in your business insurance policy. This type of coverage exists to protect you, your business, and your employees in case any of them get hurt or sick while working for you.” – Experts at USA Business Insurance.

You may also need directors and officers and general liability insurance to protect employees from potential issues with customers.

  1. Employee Engagement

Did you know that only 33 percent of employees in the United States are engaged in their jobs, according to Gallup’s “2017 State of the American Workplace” report? In fact, employee engagement as a whole increased only 3 percent from 2012 to 2016, according to the aforementioned report.

Employee engagement is critical to a company’s success. After all, an engaged employee is a productive one. To increase employee engagement, bring the following into your culture and HR processes:

  • Gamification: Incorporate gamification into employee activities, such as achievement-tracking and peer competition.
  • Incentives: Financial and non-financial incentives, such as rewards and recognition, give employees something to work toward. In addition, they reinforce attitudes and behaviors that will help the organization succeed.You can make the process of tracking these incentives, and the milestones that designate them, with an employee recognition and engagement platform such as Achievers.
  • Employee Surveys: Conduct surveys on a regular basis to let employees know that their voice is being heard and valued.
  1. Career Advancement Programs

An organization’s biggest and most precious investment is its employees. Yet, many organizations don’t invest enough in the development of their employees. A career advancement program helps sustain employee engagement, as employees are given the opportunity to progress both personally and professionally.

In addition, it helps nurture talent within the organization, reducing the time and costs associated with hiring outside employees.

A successful career advancement program should help employees set achievable goals and offer in-house training sessions. Toastmasters International, for example, is a communication and leadership development program that teaches employees to become more effective communicators.

  1. Corporate Image

Maintaining a strong, positive corporate image is important, helping you attract top talent to a growing team. The HR department plays a critical role in upholding an organization’s image:

“Specifically, you [HR professional] should think about how your branding is reflected in your recruitment efforts, workplace and involvement in social media,” – Tiffany Aller, ADP’s Spark blog.

Aller suggests asking yourself the following questions:

  • If your branding revolves around innovation, does your company culture reflect that?
  • Are your branding campaigns focused on technology—and does your staff have access to the newest and latest equipment?
  • How is your company reflected on social media, both formally through company channels and informally through individual employees?”
  1. Performance Management System

To make goal-setting successful, you need to have a tracking system in place. Without an advanced performance management system, it’s difficult for employees to gauge their progress and stay motivated in reaching their goals. Not to mention, keeping track manually can get messy and is less reliable.

If you haven’t yet, invest in a performance management system that makes it easy for employees and managers to track and measure progress throughout the year. If you have trouble getting buy-in from decision makers, ask for a free 30-day trial of the product you like most. When your trial is up, you can show higher-ups the benefits, rather than tell.

Be a Modern HR Professional

Today’s human resource departments are responsible for much more than just hiring and firing employees. They play a strategic role in the day-to-day operations of the business, especially when it comes to employee engagement, necessary insurance, corporate brand and much more. When developing or updating your HR strategy or department, don’t forget these five important pillars.

To learn more about how to improve your HR strategy, check out this webinar recording Using Recognition to Drive Engagement – A Best Practice Guide with Scotiabank.

Learn More Red CTA Button

 

 

Do you have any thoughts on this article? Share your comments below.

About the Author
Jessica ThiefelsJessica Thiefels has been writing for more than 10 years and is currently a professional blogger and freelance writer. She spent the last two years working tirelessly for a small startup, where she learned a lot about running business and being resourceful. She now owns her own business and has been featured on Forbes. She’s also written for StartupNation, Manta, Glassdoor and more. Follow her on Twitter @Jlsander07 or connect on LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

Woman Takes Employee Surveys for Employee Morale

How does that make you feel? Why employee mood is important

If you want to keep a pulse on your company’s health, you need to understand how engaged or disengaged your employees are feeling on a regular basis. It’s no longer sufficient to gauge employee satisfaction just once or twice a year. After all, if leadership, employee morale, or performance problems aren’t solved quickly, they can lead to a drop in productivity, job satisfaction, and customer service. Big data and frequent employee surveys are a great way to measure employee mood and satisfaction in real time.

Why companies need to understand their workforce

There’s a reason world-class companies are constantly assessing employee satisfaction: engaged employees are the engine that fuels growth, great ideas, and customer satisfaction.
It’s important to remember that employee engagement directly relates to the success of an organization. Would employees recommend other skilled people in the industry for a job at your company? Do they project a positive image when dealing with your clients and customers? Do employees feel they can openly approach supervisors with suggestions? If you don’t know the answer to these questions, then disengaged employees might negatively impact your business without you realizing it.

Stay on top of employee needs every day

Businesses are using real-time data to track their markets, their customers’ behaviors, their advertising performance, and more. So why don’t we start applying this same level of analysis to tracking employee engagement? Forget annual surveys: you should be measuring engagement on a weekly, if not daily, basis.

Frequent employee surveys will allow you to track the effects of changes in your business, such as new system implementation, changes in management, changes in company structure, or anything else that might affect engagement and morale.

Make smart changes based on employee feedback

Employee surveys are an excellent way to keep managers informed. Gather feedback on a variety of your business practices, including training, onboarding, work environment, leadership effectiveness, systems, and more. This feedback will empower you to take a data-driven approach to improving your processes, evaluating your leadership team, and improving employee engagement.

It’s also worth using survey data to influence business decisions. Will employees react positively to a merger? What benefits do they actually want? What do they think about your company’s new growth strategy? These are the kinds of important questions a survey can answer quickly to keep your business on track.

What if there was a Net Promoter Score for employee engagement?

social_reputationA company is only as good as its Net Promoter Score, or so the popular wisdom goes. Evangelists like the Harvard Business Review claim it’s “the one number you need to grow:” an objective, numerical representation of just how much your customers like you. Administered periodically, the Net Promoter Score (NPS) surveys a random sample of customers and asks how likely they are to recommend your company to a friend. As a snapshot of public feelings about you, it’s extremely helpful for identifying not only the prevailing sentiment in a given moment, but also trends and changes in perception over time.

The implications of a good NPS are obvious: happy customers are repeat customers, not to mention advocates for your brand. There has always been a strong correlation between customer satisfaction and company revenue, which is why businesses spend so much money on good customer service.  There’s no doubt about it: large companies are wise to keep an eye on their NPS—or any other customer satisfaction metric—to make sure they’re keeping consumers happy.

And yet, customer satisfaction is far from the only KPI that matters. Read more →