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hire on a budget

Tips and Tricks: Hiring on a Budget

If you’ve ever touched the recruiting process, you’re well aware that hiring can be expensive! However, you probably also know that making a bad hire is even more expensive. According to Forbes, a bad hire can costs an employer “thousands of dollars”. So what are the best ways to hire with different levels of budget? We’ve helped compile some top tips and tricks for those hiring on any budget.

Under $50

If you only have $50 to spend on hiring you’re largely limited to free options which is not necessarily a bad thing.  Sometimes it takes going back to the basics to get someone’s attention. For example, start with printing or buying a help wanted sign and putting it in the window of your business. The best employees are often customers of your business since they already understand what your business does and are obviously willing to support it. You’ll also want to consider posting help wanted flyers on bulletin boards around town.  Once you’ve posted your ad physically, you should turn to social media and post it on your company and personal pages. Encourage your employees to share it since they often have friends and a large network who might be looking for new jobs.

Then of course, there are the online options. Place your job ad on some of the free online job boards. There are thousands of these boards so pick three or four that best fit your target audience, create an ad, and consider it ready-to-go. Here is a quick list of free job boards to help you get started.

$51 – $100

So now you have a some money to spend on finding a perfect employee, congratulations! You should still start by doing everything in the under $50 budget because it will maximize your results without taking up any of your current budget. The next step is to start looking at paid options to promote your ad. Although you can’t quite afford some of the more expensive job boards like Monster, you should be able to create job postings on a number of sites such as Indeed, Craigslist and more. Because you can only afford one posting, it is important to optimize that posting as much as possible. A simple Google search on “How to Optimize a Job Posting” can help you take your strategy a step further and increase your chances of getting results from a job listing.

$101-$1000

As stated before, you should definitely start by doing everything in the budget categories listed above. Fortunately, you now have a fairly decent sized budget to post job ads. You can now afford to post to some of the more expensive job board options such as Glassdoor, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. or you can create multiple ads on some of the cheaper job boards I already mentioned. Your best bet is to test both options – you never know what works well until you start measuring. If an inexpensive Craigslist ad is working well for you, post a few of them. If not, consider posting to some new job boards. Every business and audience is different, and prefers different job posting channels. The extra budget will give you the flexibility to get insights and take your hiring to the next level with more strategic thinking.  

$1000+

If your budget is hitting in the thousands, then you’re given the opportunity to heavily invest in hiring top talent and that will pay off big time. At this level of budget you have much more flexibility as far as advertising your job opening. In addition to the previous budget levels, you can look at hiring more specialized recruiters that focus on specific industries and job types. Consider hiring someone to write great job ads for you – the right job ad copy can dramatically impact the amount of applicants that come through. To prevent wasting your budget however, you’ll want to test different options to see what works. Start by looking into paid packages on job board platforms that provide you more features to help distribute and measure your job postings for maximum performance and impact.

The next time you’re recruiting with a new budget, consider our top tips and tricks. With today’s competitive job market, it’s important to recruit smarter in order to bring in a strong job candidate pool and hire the right person for your company.

To learn more, check out the white paper The War for Talent is Here: Is Your Workplace Ready?

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will zimmermanAbout the Author
Will Zimmerman is a content marketer for Proven, the small business hiring tool. He is from Boulder, Colorado, and when he’s not writing awesome content, he enjoys all things outdoors including, but certainly not limited to, skiing, camping, hiking, and surfing.

 

 

 

Creative ideas to draw in top talent

18 Ways: How to Find your Dream Candidate for 2017

“Whatever your life’s work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

You’re looking to expand your team. Congratulations on your company’s growth spurt! Now you want to find candidates that fit your company culture and bring the right expertise to the job. While you could just post to one of the huge job sites like Craigslist or Indeed, there are a number of other unique and creative ways to grab the attention of your future colleague, and here are a few…

Offer Rewards:  Offer a financial incentive to your current employees to assist with finding their new office buddy who will go the distance. Your staff know best what your company is all about and what success in the job entails. Set them on a mission to find the perfect candidate and reward them accordingly if they succeed.

Turn to your Network: Ask connections on your social networks to recommend people they think might be the right fit for your business. When candidates apply for the job you can see if you have any mutual connections and then reach out to those connections for “insider” information about the candidate.

Hangout: If you want to find the best talent in this hugely competitive market, go to where they are! Attend user’s groups, peruse online forums and read influential blogs; but don’t just lurk, comment and interact so they become familiar with you and your employer brand. Learn how to communicate authentically with the audience you are hoping to attract and you may be rewarded by finding a candidate you never even knew was in the market.

Niche Job Boards: Instead of putting your job listing into the mix of the huge job sites, you can target ideal candidates by using smaller, niche job boards that service specific business sectors  and categories such as creative, media, nonprofit, start up, technology, etc.

Go Local: There are local chapters of associations for every possible business field on the planet. By attending association meetings, you might find the right employee with just the right skill set for your company.

Hire Inside: Perhaps the candidate you are looking for already resides within your company. Keep an eye out for existing employees who are up for new challenges and encourage their growth and development by applying for a job outside their prescribed career path.

Heads up for the Boomerang: Don’t forget those great people you’ve previously worked with at different companies or those who worked at your current organization before and might be excited to come back. Either way, reaching out to former colleagues can be an invaluable enterprise when looking to fill a job opening. As an added bonus, you won’t have to time upfront getting to know them – your shared history makes it so you can get down to business.

Eyes Wide Open: Quite often the best candidates already have jobs, so be on the lookout for exceptional customer service and transferable skills, even from people in roles that don’t exactly match your current job opening. The right candidate rarely just falls from the sky, sometimes you have to headhunt and poach.

Cold Emailing: Emailing is still the most effective marketing tool out there. If you craft a personalized, specific email with engaging content for the potential candidate you will probably receive a thoughtful response. Recruiting emails often command more respect and consideration than other forms of less personal approaches.

Alumni trawling: Target the alumni networks of colleges and other learning institutions in line with your job requirement. At a minimum, you’ll know you’re getting a candidate with a strong educational background.

Paid Internships: What? Actually pay an intern? For a nominal fee you can put your intern through a rigorous program to gauge their skills and see if they are a fit for your organization. If they excel, hire them permanently.

Buddy system: What about hiring a trusted, personal friend? You’ll be spending loads of time together and you already have an established level of trust and rapport with each other. Win-win! Be careful though, as this strategy does come with some risks. Make sure your friend is a good fit for your company – and vice versa – or you could be risking more than just losing a new employee!

Virtual “Help Wanted” Sign: Have a permanent “we are looking to hire” button on your website so you can collect resumes from visitors. If individuals are being proactive by searching a company’s website, you’ve already found a candidate who is willing to do some research.

Tried and tested: You can always use a recruitment agency. They are financially motivated to find you the right candidate and they can save you from wading through thousands of resumes.

Fair Trade: While seemingly antiquated, a good old fashioned career fair could be where you meet the perfect candidate. If you prefer to not leave the comfort of your home or office, a virtual one works just as well.

Community Outreach: Approach a nonprofit organization for assistance with sourcing candidates. They are always looking to place their clients in opportunities where they can succeed, and they have usually done all of the necessary background checks for you.

Resume Redux: Keep the top candidates from the last time you hired on file. When a new job opening comes up – go through these files; perhaps you already have the candidate you are looking for right under your nose.

Use Facebook ads: Target your ideal candidate with a targeted ad. This can help separate the wheat from the chaff, and likely cut down candidates that express only a cursory interest.

“Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.” — Aristotle

Remember that wherever you choose to list your job opening, make sure you have crafted a clearly defined job description. You don’t want to receive a ton of applications from unsuitable candidates. When crafting your description you should illustrate to potential candidates the benefits of working for your company along with a clear description of the job expectations. Keep in mind that it’s crucial that your company culture is also attractive to the candidate. After all, these days companies are judged on more than just the financial compensation given.

Let your job listing speak to potential new hires as if they are a customer or prospect. Really sell them on the promise of your company and its unique mission and values. Go to company review sites to find out the perceived negatives of your particular industry and counteract that with a job offer that addresses job issues head on.

Individuals might look great on paper but can they actually do the job? Trust your instincts and don’t be scared to go after passive candidates (those who already have a job and might not be looking for a new one).

In the end, don’t settle, be patient. Hiring the wrong candidate can drastically affect your business and spark another prolonged hiring search.

If you think it’s expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. Red Adair

About the Author

Randi ShermanRandi Sherman is a content writer providing all your literary needs and actionable insights to drive new business and improve your bottom line with The Social Calling.