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Celebrate Your Employees

10 Meaningful Ways to Celebrate Your Employees

Are you celebrating your employees on a regular basis? The people who work for your organization perform essential functions for you, and in return you should respect them, appreciate them, and be supportive of them. It’s time to celebrate your employees with thoughtful gestures that can take their employee experience to the next level. Here are 10 meaningful ways to show your employees how much you appreciate everything they do:

1. Eliminate the Bullies

Even careful hiring and screening procedures can fail occasionally, accidentally adding a bully or troublemaker into the employee mix. This can demoralize the rest of your staff, and you may lose some of your more dedicated workers. A 2017 nationwide survey of workplace bullying found that 60 million people are affected by bullying on the job, and 29 percent of the victims remain silent about it. Basic concern for your staff begins with making sure they feel safe at work.

2. Get to Know Your Employees Better

Communication works more effectively when people know each other better. Zappos, famed for its employer brand, has an “80-20 rule,” which mandates that managers spend at least 20 percent of their time with their team members. Zappo’s Insights trainer Kelly Wolske says, “When you get to know each other on a personal level, mutual respect grows. Knowing someone’s triggers as well as their strengths can also improve communication.”

3. Offer Employee Recognition

Levi King, CEO of Nav and founder of Lendio and other businesses, emphasizes the importance of acknowledging everyone’s contributions as a way of showing appreciation in the workplace. He writes, “Go out of your way to acknowledge unique efforts and success. Recognition is the icing on the cake of achievement, and it tastes delicious.”

4. Design Workspaces That Encourage Movement

Innovative companies are taking a second look at the layout of workspaces and increasing their employees’ productivity by encouraging them to move around during the day. A recent paper by design company Teknion notes that most office jobs keep workers tethered to a chair, while “alert, engaged, and healthy workers are most often those who are afforded a stimulating and inspiring work environment that encourages movement — to sit, stand and walk around.”

5. Define a Career Path for Each Employee

A major factor that leads workers to seek new employers is stagnation at their current jobs. “Workers who stay longer in the same job without a title change are significantly more likely to leave for another company for the next step in their career,” according to Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor. Neglecting employee development can also have a measurable negative effect on your company’s bottom line.

6. Set an Example of Positive Energy

If you don’t seem glad to see your employees each day, those workers aren’t going to feel that they matter to you. Show that you care about them as people by putting out vibes that are encouraging and upbeat. Leadership trainer Shari Bench tells managers, “Do not wait for others to create the positive, rewarding, motivating environment that you have had the power to create all along.”

7. Ask for Employee Opinions

When you care about people, their opinions are important to you. The reverse of this statement is just as true: If you ask people about their thoughts, preferences and creative ideas, they will feel that you value them as individuals. Entrepreneur recommends that managers “ditch the suggestion box” and instead create a culture of transparency and fearlessness, in which everyone feels encouraged to speak up.

8. Reward Good Efforts

According to a study published in Business News Daily, “85 percent of workers surveyed felt more motivated to do their best when an incentive was offered, and 73 percent described the office atmosphere as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ during an incentive period.” The article notes that reliably offering employee rewards and incentives elevates levels of employee engagement, an essential element for building a sustainable business.

9. Encourage Employees to Take a Break

We don’t just mean coffee breaks here. Your workers need to have your permission — and in some cases, your friendly insistence — that when they leave work at night, they can ignore work emails and focus completely on the rest of their lives. To maintain good health and avoid burnout, they need to take all their vacations days as well; American workers left 658 million vacation days unused in 2015, lowering their productivity and depressing their attitude about their jobs.

10. Don’t Forget Free Food

No discussion of valuing your workers would be complete if we didn’t mention snacks. Food is one of those perennial forms of caring guaranteed to delight almost everyone. In a recent survey of millennials, 48 percent said that if they were looking for a new job, the availability of snacks would be a factor in their decision, and in one company, workers said the introduction of a seltzer machine was “life-changing.”

The common thread among all the measures listed above is that employees feel valued when their needs and efforts are individually recognized. To optimize your company’s productivity and attract the best talent in a competitive market, you must create a culture of recognition. To learn more about how to establish best-practice methods for giving employee recognition and rewards, download our e-book, “Recognition Culture: The MVP of Employee Experience.”

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The Neuroscience of Engagement

The Neuroscience of Employee Engagement

Job satisfaction is at the heart of employee engagement. And as early as 1959, it received decisive momentum when Psychologist Frederick Herzberg published the Two Factor theory of motivation. Herzberg’s research suggests that fulfilment at work is due to two set of factors:

  1. Motivators – intrinsic conditions of the job
  2. Hygiene factors – extrinsic factors causing in dissatisfaction if absent

With more advancements in brain science over past decades, Herzberg’s psychological studies have been given deeper scientific substance. Today, neuroscience (the study of the nervous system) can explain the fundamentals of human motivation at a molecular level.

This makes me question: how can we leverage neuroscience findings to help optimize employee engagement initiatives?

Let’s explore …

Neuroscience and Motivation

In “Motivation on the Brain – Applying the Neuroscience of Motivation in the Workplace”, Kimberly Schaufenbuel details the four core drivers of motivation at work:

  1. Drive to Defend: this is the only brain circuit triggered when people feel threatened.The most common “threat” at work is to feel undervalued. Usually triggered by lack of feedback or line manager interactions, it can be fixed through continuous, positive feedback.
  2. Drive to Acquire: the need to seek, to take control, and to retain objects and personal experiences of value in pursuit of immediate gratification.This can be fulfilled with short term gratification through employee recognition and rewards.
  3. Drive to Bond: the brain is wired to be social, and this drive allows like-minded people with shared interests to work cooperatively together.This is strengthened by a company culture where collaboration is valued, and leaders positively “walk the talk”.
  4. Drive to Learn: The natural desire to make sense of our world and ourselves. It exists in a cooperative atmosphere where curiosity is rewarded and knowledge freely shared.Through appreciation and gratitude, you can encourage creativity and learning.

Address the Drive to Defend: Continuous Feedback

Drive to Defend- Neuroscience and Engagement

Did you know that our brain interprets “social pain” much like physical pain?

This is the conclusion of the work by Naomi Eisenberger, Psychologist at UCLA.

Let’s take employee feedback and annual reviews for instance. If sporadic, people can experience those as an attack on their “status”. The brain is quick to perceive feedback like a physical attack, and reacts with a defensive strategy.

Achievers, a leader in employee engagement and recognition, has been an advocate of continuous feedback and listening. Egan Cheung, Vice President of Product at Achievers, shared at the 8th Annual Achievers Customer Experience (ACE) conference in New Orleans:

“To engage a modern workforce, an organization needs to be continuously listening to its employees.”

Access to constant feedback is now real. Achievers recently released Listen, where employees can provide feedback to management on their day-to-day issues via check-ins and pulse surveys.

Achievers’ Listen goes even a step further, taking into consideration the importance of positive feedback. Allie, an intelligent, digital “coach”; interacts with employees in a familiar conversational way, while guiding employees with effective feedback and providing recommendations back to managers.

Address the Drive to Acquire: Incentives

Drive to Acquire - Neuroscience and Engagement

The value of incentives to motivate employees has been debated for long. Still, money can be effective to express appreciation: a survey by Harris Interactive and Glassdoor revealed that 75% of employees consider a pay raise as a form of appreciation.

But some leaders argue material gifts are a short-term fix only. What does neuroscience to say about it?

Receiving a gift triggers an immediate dopamine response in the brain. Described initially by Wolfram Schultzreward more than 30 years ago, reward systems in the brain heavily influences our behavior.

Achievers’ platform is a good example of alternatives to cash bonuses. Through points-based employee recognition, each employee can receive monetary and non-monetary based rewards and recognition.

And it works! As shared at ACE 2017, organizations using a rewards and recognition technology solution reported better levels of employee engagement, employee retention, and productivity over the course of a year.

Address the Drive to Bond: Social Connection

Drive to Bond - Neuroscience and Engagement

Matt Lieberman is the Director of UCLA’s Social Cognitive Neuroscience lab. In his TEDx St. Louis talk “The Brain and Its Superpowers”, he shares:

“Social is not one of our programs. It is our basic operating system.”

According to Matt Lieberman, the default state of the brain (when where we’re not cognitively engaged in anything specific) is to deepen our social cognition network. He shares:

“This network comes on like a reflex to think about other people’s minds — their thoughts, feelings and goals…It promotes understanding and empathy, cooperation and consideration.”

Promoting social bonds is a pivotal dimension of employee engagement. As organizations go global, a common platform to share and connect is a simple way to tap into social drive.

A case study covering Ericsson’s employee engagement and recognition program stated:

“The program spreads positivity throughout the geographically dispersed organization, connecting employees – through recognitions they post on daily basis – to each other, and to the company”

Address the Drive to Learn: Appreciation
Drive to Learn - Neuroscience and Engagement

Small acts of generosity and gratitude trigger a specific neurobiological feedback loop. Glenn R. Fox (Brain and Creativity Institute at USC), conducted extensive research and concluded:

“When the brain feels gratitude, it activates areas responsible for feelings of reward, moral cognition, subjective value judgments, fairness, economic decision-making and self-reference.”

Employee recognition can directly impact employee engagement levels. As the brain responds to gratitude with a positive feedback loop, needless to say that a recognition-based culture can do more than a feel-good effect! The by-products of gratitude at work are serious business assets, such as enhanced creativity, increased happiness and productivity, and better cooperation within teams.

By aligning your employee engagement strategies to main human motivation drivers, you tap into dopamine reward loops and create a lasting positive feeling.

What is the value behind employee engagement? To learn more, download this white paper covering The True Cost of Disengagement. 

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About the Author

Coralie SawrukCoralie Sawruk helps global organizations create efficient team dynamics. A people-person at heart, she believes the ultimate competitive advantage is created by the right talents working hand-in-hand, cheerfully.

Coralie shares her insights on human-centric leadership and leading happy teams on her website.

Get in touch on LinkedIn.

 

 

HR Technology Trends

Major Trends in HR Technology Software

Employees are the most valuable part of any organization and HR’s responsibility to engage employees is crucial for organizational growth. The latest development in the ever-changing world of HR technology software consists of major disrupters within the recent years, from listening tools to in-depth analytics and much more.

According to an article published by the Society of Human Resource Management, it was claimed ‘Investors, seeking the next big step in breakthrough technology, plunged more than $2 billion into HR tech systems and platforms in 2016.’ This clearly states the massive breadth of advancements the HR world has gained accessed to. There has been a major change in the field of human resources – from simplified employee recognition to enhanced performance management platforms, HR is becoming high tech and data-driven. Manually keeping records on file is no longer efficient and this need to stay in a modern workplace calls for robust HR technology software to assist in taking care of HR goals targeted towards employee engagement and an effortless and unbeatable employee experience.

Below are major trends in the HR technology software world:

Growth of HR Software

Bersin by Deloitte provided an HR Software evolution report in 2016, which clearly showed the evolution and market growth of HR systems over the years.

Bersin by Deloitte provided an HR Software evolution report in 2016

The report shows the progress from the year 2000. Switching from mainframe computers to personal computers was a major shift in the technological world. This led to the growth and development in the field of software and led to the creation of HR software. Client-server software delivered core HR features such as record capturing, hiring, payroll, and learning management. In 2000, talent competition grew more leading to the market for talent management software. The more advancements made in technology, the more opportunity HR had to develop platforms and programs surrounding other initiatives outside of employee record keeping, such as the ability to leverage employee engagement and employee recognition and rewards platforms. And over the years, now the entire hr technology software trend has moved and continues to move undoubtedly to cloud computing.

Switching to a Cloud-Based System

Legacy HR software has always focused on task completion and storing information. But now, companies want to replace their traditional HR software with cloud-based HR solutions. The major advantages of moving to cloud based HR software consists of anywhere access, super user-friendliness, mobile app support, easy upgrades, lesser maintenance and, most importantly, little or no requirements for IT infrastructure like hardware and trained staff. All you need is a computer and an internet connection and you are set to go!

Integration with Social Media and Learning Management

When it comes to trends, social media is leading the charge. It not only allows for network building but now social media can be an effective way to communicate at the workplace. Using simple, fun ways to communicate via emojis and hashtags can contribute to improving the employee experience. Even the ability to send social recognitions across an employee recognition platform can help boost employee engagement.

Also, Learning Management Systems (LMS) are now turning into an old tool. HR is adopting the latest web-based technology for taking interviews. Video-based learning is now a fundamental learning platform and already adopted by multiple companies. Visual element supporting features in HR software are now a must-have given the rise of VR and AI.

Predictive Analysis of Employees

A more integrated approach is being adopted when it comes to communication tools. People prefer to have an end-to-end technology-enabled platform for interpersonal communication. Tools that allow data to be collected and shared across departments and organizations are preferred because it allows quick access to real-time insight.

Pulse surveys, employee recognition and rewards, culture assessments or any other approach that merges all employee needs in one group is required by an HR department – think of it as a one-stop shop for HR. They now believe that building a predictive analysis model and harnessing employee data is more important and today many companies are spending large sums of budget to get this done.

Mobile is “The Platform”

With all this advancement in technology, we can see a whole new world coming up. If you look around, there are more mobile devices than PCs and laptops. People talk on a phone, walk with a phone and now even wake up and sleep with a phone. We prefer to access all information on our mobile.

This means that HR technology software also has to adapt accordingly. For example, mobile applications can be a huge benefit to recruiters as many high potential candidates use their mobile devices to find a job and can apply easily while on the go. HR mobile applications should be mobile-friendly and easy-to-use to stay current with how employees prefer to communicate and engage.

Breakthrough in HR Technologies

As we are now moving ahead of the computer revolution, core technologies are not enough, instead their refinements are given more importance. Simple and smart technologies have taken over the hyped and complex core technologies. User-friendliness and delivering targeted results efficiently is the main focus. Companies now ask if the HR software they are considering buying is easy to use and accessible to their employees. Overall, what matters most is smart data, value for money, and user-friendliness.

The development of HR technology software has a symbiotic relationship with both businesses and employees. It will enable organizations to grow HR initiatives more effectively – whether it is improving performance management, employee recognition, or employee engagement. Technology helps create transparency and enable employees and HR departments to stay updated on progress, engagement levels, and more.

So business owners, let’s get the ball rolling and strive to create a transparent working environment with HR technology software.

To learn more about HR tech, in particular employee engagement and analytics, download the eBook Employee Engagement: Four Places to Start Measuring What Matters.

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About the Author
Sanjay Darji
Sanjay Darji works as a software analyst at SoftwareSuggest. His interests include HR software, performance management, employee engagement, photography, and food. In his spare time, he likes to spend time with his son and catch up on the latest technologies. You can follow him on Twitter at @sanjaydarji01.

 

 

 

 

 

Reduce Employee Turnover

4 Ways to Reduce Employee Turnover and Improve Your Bottom Line

Employee turnover is one of the most bottom line busting costs associated with a company’s workforce. SHRM estimates that, for entry-level employees, the cost to fill an open position hovers near $4,000. Using this insight, if your company loses 100 employees a year, your company experiences a loss of at least $400,000.

While this number is certainly frightening, the good news is that turnover is an easily avoidable problem and with the right tools, your company can ensure that top talent is not leaving your company. It’s also worth mentioning that none of the following causes and solutions presented here exist in a vacuum—when an employee quits his or her job, it’s usually a reflection of many factors that led him or her to finally quit.

That being said, what tools and initiatives will help you reduce employee turnover? Let’s jump right in…

  1. Hire Managers Who Manage Well

Hiring managers and putting people in charge who show compassion and have the skills to manage others is one method to combat employee turnover on the front lines. Achievers employee survey showed that 57% of employees don’t feel recognized at work, and Entrepreneur claims that when workers are not recognized, they are not motivated. Low motivation can make an employee that much closer to quitting his or her job, or even put him or her over the edge far enough to finally quit.

Performing a top-down audit of your management team can have a huge effect on your entry-level workforce. While you may not have direct contact with these employees, the managers you choose certainly do. It is absolutely crucial that your management team is personable and qualified to lead. Poor managers also make it more difficult for an employee to work, and if the job itself (which may already be difficult by nature) is harder than necessary, an employee might find it not worth it to work there any longer. Address this issue early on by being transparent with recruiters about what traits you’re looking for in a manager during the hiring process.

  1. Be Flexible

Work flexibility is important for every employee at every level. I’m sure you can remember the last time you had to leave the office early or take a personal day for an inevitable issue. Being flexible with policies and protocols shows your employees that you understand that life happens. When an employee thinks that his or her employer is understanding, you reduce his or her risk of leaving the company. On the other hand, if an employee thinks that the company doesn’t understand his or her life situation, then it’s more likely that the employee will try to find a job for an employer who does care.

On the same train of thought, flexibility in other areas will show your employees that the company cares about them. Since entry-level employees may not be making as much money as they need to be able to save a hefty sum for emergency expenses, offering financial flexibility is another area to focus on if your company cannot afford to pay them more. One such initiative is allowing your employees to control the frequency of their pay. Simple add-ons to your existing payroll system allow you to do this at no cost to your company and no changes to the way your company handles payroll. In result, a study by DailyPay showed that employees are 1.9x more likely to apply for a position whose job description mentions that it offers daily payments.

  1. Prioritize Recognition and Rewards

Along with the previous point about hiring managers that care, instilling an employee recognition and rewards program that allows you to easily highlight achievements and strong work will also show your employees that you care and appreciate them. Making it as simple as possible for your managers to recognize employees on a daily basis will help ensure that your managers are actively participating. By promoting this type of program across your organization, you are letting employees know that your company takes employee recognition and happiness very seriously.

Recognizing employees will directly help improve your bottom line. For example, an Achievers’ video highlighted the following findings:

  • a 1% increase in employee engagement returns an additional .6% growth in sales for your company
  • 50% of HR leaders said that an increase in employee recognition would boost employee retention
  1. Offer Unique Advantages

In the current job market, it’s becoming increasingly harder and harder to hire top talent due to the record low unemployment rate and tight job market. Employees across all industries and skill levels are continually searching around to see which company will offer him or her the best complete package. Additionally, it’s been reported that if you offer help to improve financial wellness, employees are more willing to work for your company. The plain advice is that offering work perks and advantages that your competitors are not offering will help put your business ahead in overall employee preference.

Now more than ever, it’s crucial that your company is doing everything in its power to retain your current workforce and improve its employee retention rate. Since it is incredibly hard to fill open positions, you must prevent the need to fill open positions by retaining your workforce. In turn, your company will save time and improve its bottom line significantly without the recruitment costs and countless hours spent searching for talent. Try out some of these tips and let us know which worked best for your company.

To learn more about employee retention, check out this fun infographic covering 6 Stats That Speak to Employee Retention.

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About the Author
Seth LoftisSeth Loftis
Seth Loftis works at DailyPay, Inc., a financial solutions company dedicated to reducing employee turnover by improving the financial lives of employees. Employees can receive their wages days before their scheduled payday at no cost to your company or change to your existing payroll system. Learn more at trydailypay.com or follow them on Twitter or LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

effectively measure engagement

Employee Engagement: How to Measure What Matters

Recently, there have been some eye-opening reports about the state of employee engagement, both here in the U.S. and globally. Aon Hewitt, in their 2017 Trends in Global Employee Engagement Study, found that engagement levels have dropped for the first time in five years and Gallup reported in its State of the American Workplace report that a full 70% of U.S. workers are not engaged at work.

But before we all get too breathless about these admittedly disconcerting engagement numbers, it’s important to remember that employee engagement is not an end in and of itself. Engagement numbers do provide a window into the general well-being of your workforce, but more important than the raw numbers is how engagement ties back to desired business outcomes.

Say, Stay, Strive

Aon Hewitt, in an influential 2015 paper advanced the “Stay, Stay, Strive” framework for the variety of desired Employee Engagement outcomes. According to that model, engagement drives a variety of desirable outcomes, including increased employee advocacy and a more desirable employer brand, (“Say”), improved retention and tenure (“Stay”), and better overall performance (“Strive”):

“One manager may have an employee who is incredibly hardworking but needs to say more positive things about the company due to his/her network impact on peers. Another manager may have employees who generally seem positive about the company and committed to staying, but need to ramp up individual effort toward the new performance behaviors required by an organizational transformation.”

So it really isn’t just about the score, it’s about understanding what you need to measure in order to achieve the desired business outcome.

Are You Measuring What Matters?

Do you know how well your engagement programs are working? How about the connection between programs that engage employees, such as employee recognition and rewards, and your desired business results?

Employee engagement has become a cornerstone and calling-card of today’s most successful businesses. But instituting a haphazard or incomplete engagement initiative can often lead to more problems than solutions, as employees dutifully fill out their surveys but nothing ever seems to come of it.

Successful employee engagement programs should tie back to specific organizational goals, help to align employee values with company values, and ultimately — drive improvements in overall performance. Studies have shown that highly engaged employees are:

  • 21% more profitable;
  • 17% more productive, and;
  • Enjoy 20% higher sales than industry peers with average engagement.

Whether your measure for success is better employee retention, improved alignment with company goals, or increased revenue, your journey begins in first knowing what to measure and how to do it well.

An engaged workforce is almost always a profitable workforce. According to Gallup, companies with a well-defined culture of recognition and commitment to employee engagement have been shown to outperform their peers by 147 percent in earnings per share. Learning how to measure engagement – and what to measure – are the first steps towards realizing the engagement advantage. By measuring engagement in a number of ways and against a number of different metrics, companies can then learn what actions they need to take to improve in this important area of differentiation.

What you’ll learn

Having a better understanding of what makes your organization tick can help you find a competitive edge that you didn’t know existed. In our new eBook, “Employee Engagement: Four Places to Start Measuring What Matters,” we provide four ways to effectively measure the results of your engagement programs to ensure success in areas critical to your business – such as employee retention, performance against goals, and alignment with company values. Download the eBook now and begin learning how to measure what matters!

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About the Author

Josh Danson

Josh is Director of Content Marketing at Achievers. An accomplished marketing and communications professional with more than 20 years’ experience in the fields of marketing and PR, Josh worked as a press secretary on Capitol Hill before moving West, and from politics into PR – and on into content marketing. Josh graduated with High Honors in History from Kenyon College and lives in San Francisco with his wife and 9 year-old daughter. In addition to work and family, he is passionate about music, politics and fly fishing (not necessarily in that order).